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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 22
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English 22
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)
a living. this is what has become of the ancient city. he has lost his home and his job, so every day he sifts through filth and stench so he can feed his children. life is really bad. there is no work and money. that is why i come here to collect and rubbish. this revolution was supposedly about a better future and a better tomorrow, and many residents still cling to that hope, and they believe the ongoing fighting, not just in the city but also in the countryside, is worth the struggle. a petrol now comes from a barrel at the side of the road. three times the price it was before the revolution. people queued for hours in the cold for bread, now 10 times more expensive and in short supply. the bombardment has subsided, but the suffering has not, and the fighting has moved elsewhere. we joined the rebels on an operation, running across open ground to avoid sniper fire. now the fighters are laying siege to an infantry training school. the free syrian army controls most of the land here, and so the 300 government troops inside know they are surrounded. no reinforcements to come. the rebels
by these funders. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> charlie: charles dickens the great british writer was born in 1812. his 200th birthday is being celebrated including at new york's morgan library. >> on assignment for charlie rose at new york's museum of library and museum. peepierpont morgan was an averae collector of dickens. the museum holds the largest collection in america. we are joined by dr. the curator and department head of literacy and historical manuscripts at the morgan library. >> here we are in mr. morgan's study. we're looking at the first installments of david copperfield. one schilling would have got you your monthly part. and here is the beginning part of the booklets and it is just page after page after page of advertisements for books and pills and remedies and all kinds of things. here you have the original illustrations that accompany each part separated by tissue, of course, so they didn't smudge each other. here's the very first page of the narrative, whether i turn out to be the hero of my own life
killed and others wounded. the shootings followed similar incidents in pakistan's largest city of karachi, where four female health workers were shot dead. across the country, authorities have suspended the polio eradication drive for the time being. many who want their children vaccinated are disappointed. >> i want to get my son back, but there is no one here. >> we headed to a carracci neighborhood, where a health worker was shot dead on tuesday. this is a slum area often considered too dangerous for the police and paramilitary troops to penetrate. two workers were killed in the houses behind me. it is too dangerous to go there, but we have come to that area hoping to speak to the victims' families. the anti polio campaigners fromlive the short distance where they were killed. the family was devastated. gunmen shot at her family while they were visiting. she says may face resistance in their efforts. >> the women want their children to be vaccinated, but some are warned against it by their man, who says the program is a conspiracy to spoil future generations. the women say this is the
from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: george osborne is here. he is britain's chancellor of the exchequer. he has been called the austerity chancellor. he continues to lead the increasingly controversial austerity process. in a piece called "god sieve the british economy" in the upcoming "new york times" magazine adam davidson writes "in the past two years the united states has experienced a steep downturn followed by steady though horrendously slow upturn. the british economy, however, is profoundly stuck. the u.k. has been put on negative watch on three largest credit rating agencies. the european union is britain's largest trading partner, europe's economy remains on prepares you footing despite several months of relative calm and there's a growing debate about whether the u.k. should lead the e.u. earlier this month we covered the "economist" magazine read "good-bye europe, look what happened when britain left the e.u. " i'm pleased to have george osborne back on this program and back at this table. >> thank you very much. >> rose: you're in new york city
. only a few roads are available. and going out of the city into the suburban areas that are held by the free syrian army. what you can see is a deterioration in the position of the regime and the strain of war as well. will that result in and trying to somehow do a deal? i do not know. but i know that a political deal is the only real choice the syrians have. if they do not get that, they face a long and bloody war. >> today, we have the american and russian foreign ministers meeting with the u.n. envoy to syria at a conference in ireland. russia has been a key player. do you understand whether the russians are getting closer to a western position when it comes to assad's future? >> if they are common their remarks from the meeting did not seem to suggest that they were prepared to go the extra mile or make some kind of deal. the issue is the fact that the u.n. security council is paralyzed. paralyzed over this whole issue of syria. the western countries have one position. russia and china have another. both sides actually need to move. holding on to positions that do not work. a
communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> we shall go on to the end. we shall fight in france. we shall fight on the seas and oceans. we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air. we shall defend our island, whatever the cost may be. we shall fight on the beaches. we shall fight on the landing grounds. we shall fight in the fields and in the streets. we shall fight in the hills. we shall never surrender. >> rose: winston church sill recognized as one of the greatest statesmen of all times. in 1954 edward r. murrow the cbs newsman said he mobilized the english language and sent it into battle. president kennedy liked the quote so much that he used it as his own. that was in 1963 when he granted winston churchill honorary citizenship of the united states. >> pierpont morgan was a friend of churchill's mother and is likely that winston on one of his many trip to its united states would have visited this library. we're joined today by alan packwood, he is the director of the churchill archive center in cambridge. and he's cure rating an ex
by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: british period dramas have long held a special fascination for american television audiences, upstairs, downstairs, pride and prejudice have been released to widespread attention and praise, downton abbey anybody the most successful and the latest, oscar-winning prize winner julian fellows already won six emmys and legions on fans on both sides of the pond. it is back on pbs in january and here is a teaser for the third season. >> from war and peace downton abbey still stands. >> no one must know. >> i am warning you. >> rose: joining me now, four of the stars, hugh bonneville, plays lord granderson familiar. >> elizabeth mcgovern. >> lady grantham. >> jim carter plays the butler and joanne greg plays anna, the head house made, i am proud to have all of you here. >> let me start and go around and tell me where you left your character and what to expect this year. >> the end of season 2. >> robert was relieved that the war and the spanish flu had deserted at long last and maybe he would get his home
captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: master ricardo muti is here, one of the world's great conductors. he has lead some of the best orchestras including the vienna philharmonic, he is currently music director of the chicago symphony orchestra, critics and audiences alike have been dazzled and charmed by the intensity, the technique, the emotion that he and his musicians bring. here is a look at a performance of verdi's requiem. >> when you look at the journey of your life, from the violin, piano, goesing, conducting, is that the perfect sign of flow for someone who wants to lead a great orchestra? >> first i didn't want to be a musician. so the first quality, i mean the first, if you don't want something and you get it. and but i studied very seriously but fortunately-- . >> rose: what did you want to be, do. >> first my father was a medical doctor. we are five brothers. and he wanted one to be a doctor, one to be an architect, one to-- my profession was opposed to become a lawyer, that would have been a disast
the abbey road crossing, so i am used to seeing graffiti go up on the wall every year nearby city -- every year when you're my studio. a guy painted. -- paints it. i die somewhere else -- i tag somewhere else. i had a private school education, boarding school education, and i did not go to university, where it would have been expected for me to go because it was one of those kinds of schools, but i went straight to drama school, and our drama schools are more like what he would call a conservatory like to the yard, -- like julliard, they are rare here, but there are more there. i performed on broadway. i have done classical theater. i've played hamlet, and i really did that for seven or eight years, and then a band of brothers happened when i was 28, 29 years old. they did not know me from adam, and that transform things for me. i was mixing film roles with these roles, and it has been like this ever since. i have worked with extraordinary people like larry freeman twice and jennifer lopez and larry and steven spielberg. tavis: you went from morgan freeman to steven spielberg with lo as th
staff for their own safety. those who remain will be restricted to the capital city, damascus. separately, the u.s. voiced mounting concern about activity at syrian government sites storing chemical weapons. this afternoon, president obama warned syrian leader bashar al- assad not to cross that line. oday i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences. and you will be held accountable. >> sreenivasan: in response, syria's government released a statement saying it would never use chemical weapons on its own people. the regime has never confirmed it has such weapons. there were warnings about greater curbs on the internet, as the world's nations gathered today for a summit on telecommunications. the 11-day conference in dubai is the first such review since 1988, well before the web was fully formed. the u.s. has raised concerns that china, russia, and others will seek new limits on
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: one of the deadliest battle office the war in afghanistan took place on the morning of october 3rd, 2009, nearly 400 taliban fighters attacked 53 american troops stationed at a remote military base known as combat outpost keating, a, eight soldiers died, a pentagon investigation revealed the outpost had no strategic value, jake tapper is a senior white house correspondent for abc news at a hospital holding my newborn son when he heard the tragic report, that story compelled him to report about it, he documents his findings in a new book, the book is called the outpost to an untold story of american central lohr. author john i can't your writes if you want to understand how the war in afghanistan went off the rails you need to read this book. i am pleased to have jake tapper back on this program, and especially at this table .. lcome. >> thank you, charlie, it is great to be here. >> rose: take me to the time you saw this story, because you are a busy man, you know, a newborn. >> yeah. >>
by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: les miserables is one of the best loved muse calls of all time, 60 million people have gone to see victor hugo 1862 novel of tragedy, romance and revolution sung into life it is now one of the year's most anticipated movies. here is the trailer for the film. ♪ i dreamed a dream in time gone by ♪ ♪ and hope was high, life worth living ♪ ♪ i dreamed that love would never die ♪ ♪ i dreamed that god would be forgiving ♪ ♪ but the tigers come at night ♪ ♪ thunder ♪ i had a dream my life would be ♪ ♪ no different from the tale i'm living ♪ ♪ no different now from what it seemed ♪ ♪ a life has killed a dream i dreamed ♪ ♪. >> rose: joining me now is the director tom hooper, his last movie the king's speech won an oscar for best picture. also with us anne hathaway. she brings new grit and passion to the role of the tragic heroine and hugh jack mann jean valjean. i'm pleased to have all of them back at this table. welcome. >> thank you. >> how hard is it to take this k
sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: andy warhol is considered by many to be the most important artist of the 21st century, though critics and artist debate the meaning of his work, few question his impact on contemporary art. this is the subject of of the metropolitan musician exhibition called "regarding warhol: 60 artists, 50 years." it showcases 45 works by warhol alongside 1200 works by 60 other artists influenced by him. joining me are two curators, mark rosenthal and marla prather. also are three of the artists featured in the show: jeff koons john currin and my good friend chuck close. i'm pleased to have all of them here at this table. let me start with you, mark. somebody once said to me great books begin with a question. do great exhibitions begin with a question? >> well, that's what i hope. the question here is, is andy warhol the most impactful artist? >> rose: impactful rather than important? >> i prefer that. i prefer that because i think of his effect being like a meteor hitting the earth and changing climact
Search Results 0 to 21 of about 22 (some duplicates have been removed)